Incredible Sites From the Chicago World’s Fair

You take the same route to work day in and day out. You go to your same favorite bars and restaurants. You do the same sightseeing routine every time a new friend comes into town. Many of the buildings and sites you’ve been past were part of something much larger—learn what you’ve been missing.

via Flickr user William Creswell

via Flickr user William Creswell

While over 200 structures were erected for the Chicago World’s Fair, many no longer remain. You can still check out some of the original sites and structures from the 1893 global event, and you can walk on the same ground attendees walked on simply by traveling to Jackson Park.

Via Flickr user CircaSassy

Via Flickr user CircaSassy

Palace of Fine Arts

Also known as the Museum of Science and Industry, this is the only building from the original fair that’s located in Jackson Park. It has over 2,000 different exhibits, one of which is a Coal Mine which you can venture down, as well as a World War II German submarine. Admission to the museum costs between $11 and $18, and extra features, like the onboard submarine tour or the Omnimax film, cost a little extra. All are a small price to pay to see an original building from the Exposition. World’s Congress Auxiliary Building

via Flickr user JanetandPhil

via Flickr user JanetandPhil

You might know this Grant Park staple as the Art Institute of Chicago. This was originally built specifically for the Exposition as the World’s Congress Auxiliary building and it is now brimming with some of the most priceless pieces of artwork in the world, including American Gothic. General admission runs at about 20 bucks, but the fact that you get so much bang for your buck means it’s certainly money well spent, not to mention it’s one of two structures still standing from the event. St. John Cantius

via Flickr user Alan Cordovia

via Flickr user Alan Cordovia

St. John Cantius itself wasn’t built for the event, but its main and side altars were built for the World’s Fair: Columbian Exposition. This ornate church is spiritually and visually moving, and its organ is a site to behold.

via Flickr user Joe Haupt

via Flickr user Joe Haupt

Imagine the celebration of the 400th anniversary of Columbus’ arrival to the Americas. Chicago beat out New York City and Washington D.C. for this incredible honor, and this is in part why the city looks the way it does today.

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