How to Get Around Baltimore

Whether you’re new to Baltimore, playing tourist, or simply looking for a new way get around, the options can be a little overwhelming. Let us break it down so you know the best ways to get around the city.

Metro Subway

via Flickr user Anthony Lazaro

via Flickr user Anthony Lazaro

The Metro Subway in Baltimore, compared to most cities, is pretty limited. It’s one line with 15 stops, running east to west from Owings Mills to Johns Hopkins Hospital. It’s mostly used by commuters, as it doesn’t make too many stops in the touristy areas.

Hours: Mon-Fri: 5:00am – 12:00am; Sat-Sun: 6:00am – 12:00am
Fare: One-way: $1.60, Day pass: $3.50; Seniors/disabled, one-way: $0.55, Seniors/disabled, day pass: $1.20
More Info: http://mta.maryland.gov/metro-subway

Light Rail

via Flickr user David Wilson

via Flickr user David Wilson

The Light Rail serves both Baltimore city and its surrounding suburbs, consisting of three lines with 33 stops. It costs the same as a subway or local bus ride, and tickets for all three can be used interchangeably. Be sure to keep your ticket with you at all times—fare inspectors periodically check them and will hit you with a hefty fine if you don’t have one.

Hours: Mon-Fri: 5:00am – 12:00am; Sat: 6:00am – 12:00am; Sun: 11:00am – 7:00pm
Fare: One-way: $1.60, Day pass: $3.50; Seniors/disabled, one-way: $0.55, Seniors/disabled, day pass: $1.20
More Info: http://mta.maryland.gov/light-rail

Buses

via Flickr user DeShawn Harold Pretlow

via Flickr user DeShawn Harold Pretlow

With 55 routes (47 local, 4 limited stop, and 4 express), there is no shortage of buses going anywhere and everywhere in Baltimore. Local buses stop at every stop along the route, while limited stop buses (also known as “QuickBus”) only stop at major stops. Baltimore’s QuickBus can be found on Routes 40, 46, 47, and 48. Express buses are even more direct than the QuickBus.

Hours: Hours vary depending on the route. Some run 24 hours, others have limited service at night and on weekends. Use the MTA website to find the most up-to-date schedules and information.
Fare: One-way: $1.60, Day pass: $3.50; Seniors/disabled, one-way: $0.55, Seniors/disabled, day pass: $1.20
More Info: http://mta.maryland.gov/local-bus

Charm City Circulator

via Flickr user m01229

via Flickr user m01229

Launched in 2010, the privately funded Charm City Circulator is the latest addition to Baltimore’s transportation scene. The best part? It’s absolutely free! With 30 buses running along 4 routes, it’s one of the most economical ways to get around Baltimore. This system also has three water taxis (more on that below).

Hours: Mon-Thu: 6:30am – 9:00pm; Fri: 6:30am – 9:00pm; Sat: 9:00am – 12:00am; Sun: 9:00am – 9:00pm. Only runs until 8:00pm Sun-Thu from Oct 1 – Apr 30.
Fare: Free!
More Info: http://www.charmcitycirculator.com/

Baltimore Water Taxi

via Flickr user m01129

via Flickr user m01129

To travel the city from a different point of view, hop on the Baltimore Water Taxi. It makes 17 stops along five different routes, and is actually a great option for both commuters and tourists alike. You can purchase tickets online, on the boat, or at Harborview (Landing #2). The water taxi also connects to the Charm City Circulator Harbor Connector. An excellent option for commuters, the services allows you to travel directly between Maritime Park and Locust Point, Canton Waterfront Park and Locust Point, and Harborview and Harbor East.

Hours: May 1 – Sept 1: Mon-Sat: 10:00am – 11:00pm; Sun: 10:00am – 9:00pm. Reduced hours in the winter; check website for details.
Fare: Adult, one-way: $7.00; Adult, all-day: $12.00; Kids under 12: $6.00 (same price for kids whether it’s one-way or all-day, but must be accompanied by an adult with corresponding ticket).
More Info: http://www.baltimorewatertaxi.com/

Driving

via Flickr user Let Ideas Complete

via Flickr user Let Ideas Complete

The biggest factor that will determine whether or not you should drive around Baltimore is where you want go. In the touristy areas, like Inner Harbor, having a car will be more of a hindrance than anything. Parking can be quite expensive, and can be even harder if you’re planning to spend the night. While metered street parking is available, beware of a spot that looks too good to be true. Certain street spots may not be metered, but require residential permits to park.

Taxi

via Flickr user Nick Hall

via Flickr user Nick Hall

As is the case in any city, taking a taxi can be convenient but expensive. You can usually hail a cab in Downtown or Inner Harbor; be sure the driver is clear on your destination and starts the meter when he begins driving. If you’re in an area with no cabs, you can always call one. Here are some reliable taxi services in Baltimore:

  • Baltimore City Taxi, (410) 327-7777
  • County Cab, (410) 338-0000
  • Arrow Cab, (443) 575-4111
  • Best BWI Taxi Cab, Inc, (443) 377-1616
Advertisements