Chicago’s Most Epic Shipwrecks

As an enormous body of water with a maximum depth of 925 feet, Lake Michigan’s ocean-like swells bring swashbuckling danger to craft that have sailed its surface for the last 12,000 years. Dive to the depths of the lake and discover these three storied shipwrecks from history.

Wings of the Wind

via Flickr user Aaron Hall

via Flickr user Aaron Hall

A two-masted carrier used to transport coal, Wings of the Wind met its end in 1866, just 11 years after it was built. Struck by another ship early in the morning, the ship went down, leaving the crew in distress, with little damage to the other vessel. The bow remains at the bottom, with brilliant photo opportunities for adventurous divers.

For more info on Wings of the Wind, click here.

Thomas Hume

via Flickr user Jim Sorbie

via Flickr user Jim Sorbie

The mysterious disappearance of the Thomas Hume in an 1891 storm, with all debris and the six crew members vanished, led to speculation that the crew stole the ship and repainted it so no one could identify the boat. The mystery continued until the completely intact vessel was discovered in underwater southern Lake Michigan in 2006.

For more info on Thomas Hume, click here.

Wells Burt

via Flickr user Eric Gravengaard

via Flickr user Eric Gravengaard

In May of 1883, a storm of epic proportions rocked Lake Michigan, sending spurts of spray 100 feet high into the air as waves crashed on the Chicago lakefront. The Wells Burt, a coal transporter running from Buffalo to Chicago, couldn’t withstand the force and sank just 3 miles from Evanston. Today, the wreck remains intact in just 40 feet of water.

For more info on the Wells Burt, click here.

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